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The Sonata for Clarinet and Cello is one of Phyllis’s most performed works. It was first played in London in 1947 by Frederick Thurston and William Pleeth, who became lifelong friends, and to whom the work is also dedicated. It was recorded by Gervase de Peyer and William Pleeth, and by Georgina Dobree and Jack Kirstein.

 

Phyllis discovered that only one work had been written for these instruments, a duet of 1894 by a clarinettist named Johann Sobeck. She set to work on the Sonata, which was critically acclaimed as a ‘minor masterpiece’ and ‘a tour de force of the first order, revealing a wonderful sense of colour’ (Music and Letters 1950).

 

The first movement is fairly slow and mostly cantabile. A feature is the persistent interruption of the flow by a curious sotto voce semitonal passage between the two instruments, as if played in brackets. The second and third movements are fairly straightforward from the audience’s point of view. The fourth movement is the most elaborate and takes the form of free variations on thematic material heard in the first movement, but now much transformed.

 

Following the first performance at the Wigmore Hall, Martin Cooper wrote in The Spectator:  ‘At this concert the work of a young English composer, Phyllis Tate, quite overshadowed the small works by great names which composed the rest of the programme. The imaginative power, the real mercurial emotion and the wit and skill with which the two instruments are blended and contrasted makes this essay entirely successful.’

 

The Sonata was one of the works chosen to represent our country at the International Society of Contemporary Music Festival in Salzburg in 1952. Since then it has been performed many times, recently by The Varenne Ensemble (Elaine Cocks, clarinet and Robin Michael, cello) at a NASDA concert in 2014.

Sonata for Clarinet and Cello

Online performances:

DuoScope plays Phyllis Tate - 1st movement

DuoScope plays Phyllis Tate - 2nd movement

 

Scores available:

○ Clarinet and Cello parts still in print, on sale from Oxford University Press. Cello, Clarinet

○ Score available from archive supplier Allegro

○ ‘The Clarinet Chamber Music of Phyllis Tate’ dissertation by Christine M.Bellamy 2004

 

Audio clip performers: William Pleeth (cello) and Gervase De Peyer (clarinet)
Recording from a concert of Phyllis Tate’s music at the Purcell Room.

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Wigmore Hall, first performance

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This work was first performed at the Cheltenham Festival in 1953 by The New English String Quartet. It received excellent reviews ,  ‘ … It is her biggest work , both in physical dimensions and emotional range. One is tempted to say that it is also her best. It is both serious and witty, a mixture rarely successful …  she succeeds in pleasing the ear no less than she has always done, while engaging the mind more.’ (The Manchester Guardian)

 

The Quartet was written following a period of illness from 1947-1952 during which she composed very little. Always extremely self critical, despite the enthusiastic reviews, she revised the first movement for a repeat performance at The Cheltenham Festival in the Shaftesbury Hall 10 years later. A review from J.H. Elliott states ‘ … one welcomes with enthusiasm music by a contemporary which is so well knit, personal in manner and full of extrovert charm….. such music blows a sweet breath of fresh air through a stuffy atmosphere. Miss Tate does not fear sensuous beauty and is able to achieve it in an original way.’

 

A Tremula Records CD features a performance of the work by the English String Quartet. The soloists for this recording were Diana Cummings and Keith Lewis (violins) Luciano Lorio  (viola) and Geoffrey Thomas (cello). The programme notes describe the piece, ‘The first movement makes much use of the vigorous opening music on unison strings and on the cantabile theme that immediately follows it on cello. Sections of contrasting material succeed one another in an unusually constructed first movement. The second movement derives its material from the wistful theme first heard muted on the viola. The music grows agitated and disturbing and the movement ends quietly and sadly. In total contrast, the third movement is graceful and has a balletic undercurrent. The fourth movement opens with a slow chorale passage that suggests disquiet. It is succeeded by the allegro section, a lively and happy dance with a touch of mockery. The chorale briefly returns in a more cheerful guise just before the movement scurries to its conclusion.’

 

The Quartet was regularly performed, including a 1953 performance at The Royal Festival Hall  in the third concert of The Institute of Contemporary Arts ‘Three Coronation Concerts of English Music‘. It was also recorded by the BBC for airing on the Third Programme , performed by The Allegri Quartet on this occasion.

String Quartet in F Major

Score available:

○ Conductor’s score and parts on hire from Oxford University Press

 

CD available:

○ String Quartets. Tremula Records 1993. TREM 102-2

Email: mail@tremula.co.uk

 

Audio clip performers: The English String Quartet. Diana Cummings and Keith Lewis (violins), Luciano Iorio (viola) and Geoffrey Thomas (cello).

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Programme notes by the composer

Triptych was written in 1954 for violin and piano. It is sixteen minutes long and consists of three movements. It was recorded for a CD issued by Naxos in 2010, British Women Composers, with Clare Howick  on violin and Sophia Rahman on piano. The sleeve notes by Caroline Waight describe the piece… ’The first movement is a mysterious, troubled Prelude. It is followed by a brief, mercurial Scherzo that conjures up an altogether different sound world before the music rushes to an agitated, unsettling close. In the enigmatic final movement, a Soliloquy, the chorale-like opening for solo piano sets the tone before the violin enters with a pensive lyrical melody. Very gradually, the music intensifies as the two instruments interweave, before ushering in a puckish, effervescent middle section. The movement returns once more to the opening texture and mood, eventually concluding in the same cryptic vein in which it began.’

Triptych

Scores available:

○ Available from archive supplier Allegro

 

CD available:

○ British Women Composers CD. Naxos

 

Audio clip performers: Clare Howick (violin) and Sophia Rahman (piano)

A newspaper clipping

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A Seasonal Sequence was commissioned for the 1977 Ashington Festival in Northumberland with funds made available by the Arts Council. It was first performed in May 1977 with Noel Broome on viola. He plays on the recording that you can access via the link at the bottom of this page, accompanied by Keith Swallow on piano.

 

A Seasonal Sequence is written in four parts, corresponding roughly to the cycle of the turning of the year. It is rooted in three notes, E, G and B, or their transpositions.

 

Phyllis Tate said of the piece that ‘once it starts to grow, each movement goes its own way, taking on a different mood and expanding into varying shapes like the leaves of a tree unfolding. The first movement, “Snowdrop”, suggests the first touch of spring but with a wintry sting and a sharpness in the air. The second, “Rambler Rose”, is in the style of a waltz and has the languorous feeling of a sultry summer day. The third movement, “Climbing Plant”, for viola alone, thrusts in many directions and leads straight into the fourth, “Plane Tree”, a movement which is lyrical and contemplative for the most part but with a clear hint of autumn and the waning year.’

 

Hugo Cole reviewed the work for The Guardian: ‘Phyllis Tate’s A Seasonal Sequence, as always with this individual and economical composer, is full of lively invention.’

A Seasonal Sequence

Score available:

○ Unpublished.

Original score held in the British Music Collection at Heritage Quay, University of Huddersfield. Score not currently available online.

 

Audio clip performers: 1979 performance. Noel Broome (viola) and Keith Swallow (piano)

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This work for solo piano was commissioned by the City Music Society of London. They asked Phyllis to nominate a pianist to whom she would entrust the first performance and she chose

Yonty Solomon. This performance  took place at Goldsmiths’ Hall on March 12th, 1974. The programme notes that Phyllis wrote describe the composition as follows: ‘The theme of this piece is an anonymous Crusader song dating from 1147 called “Chevalier mult estes ruariz”. Originally a highly patriotic ditty, I must admit to having completely broken away from this concept of it. Troubadours, or minstrels, were often a group of entertainers and “jongleurs”, and could perform acrobatic feats as well as being poets and singers and players of musical instruments. I have tried to convey these qualities by using a wide range of textures and spacing in the piano-writing, allied to spare harmonic language. Thus I hope that something of the instrumental flavour of the period has been transferred to the modern keyboard, in stylised form.’ The notes continue with a description of each of the five movements. The work has humorous touches in keeping with the theme, including directions in the score for the pianist to play a small drum, which must be placed between their knees, in the first and last movement.

 

The Daily Telegraph reviewed the performance (13 March 1974):

 

‘In this imaginative five-movement work, Miss Tate manipulated the theme of the anonymous Crusader song with the skill of the craftsman, using the piano to convey the timbre from the various instruments, embodying the versatility of the twelfth-century minstrels who sang, danced and played at the same time: a nice touch was to give ‘’pop’’ treatment to the theme in the last movement “Epitome”. The writing is often complex but Mr Solomon elucidated it and rendered it very compelling.’

Explorations Around A Troubadour Song

Score available:

○ Available from archive supplier Allegro, email sales@allegro.co.uk   01 885 490375

 

Audio clip performers: Yonty Solomon (piano)

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Full programme notes from the first performance

Cover of original Oxford University Press edition

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This work was commissioned for the 1969 York Festival and was first performed at Yorkminster by four brass bands, led by The Black Dyke Mills Band. They also played the piece for the first radio broadcast in August 1972. It is a prime example of Phyllis’s lifelong interest in popular music and of her undogmatic and adventurous approach, always relishing the challenge of instrumentation foreign to the conventions of her contemporary musical elite.

 

It was reviewed in The Tablet (12 July 1969): ‘Especially appreciated was a new piece for brass bands (not by any means an everyday occurrence) by Phyllis Tate, commissioned by the York Festival. It was in some ways an epitome of the programme of the Concert for Massed Bands, rousing us with “Trumpets with brazen din, blast you the city’s ear”, amusing us with an illustration from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and sobering us with another from “Hamlet”.’

 

Phyllis herself wrote about the composition as follows: ‘It is often said that the brass band repertoire suffers from not having sufficient new, original material as distinct from arrangements, and that consequently much of what is played is conservative in idiom. This seems a pity when the standard of execution of the foremost bands is so tremendously high. I was therefore delighted to accept a commission from York Festival 1969 to provide a work which should have a modern edge to it and I have tried to to use the band’s sonorities in somewhat new ways. For example, the second and third movements are more delicately scored, as if they were chamber music, in contrast to the “symphonic” writing of the other movements.The quotations from Shakespeare give a fairly exact key to the nature of each piece; the last movement is a varied repeat of the first. I am indebted to Mr. William Relton for his help in scoring this work.’

 

1. ’Trumpeters with brazen din, blast you the city’s ear’ (Antony and Cleopatra)

2. ’That strain again! It had a dying fall’  (Twelfth Night)

3. ’I have a reasonable good ear in music; let us have the tongs and the bones’  (A Midsummer

     Night’s Dream)

4. ‘They bore him barefaced on the bier’ (Hamlet)

5.  Reprise of No.1

 

The work is still part of the repertoire for brass bands: ‘A delightful piece’, commented Jim Yelland on www.themouthpiece.com. It has been performed several times by the Black Dyke Band as well as by The Fairey Engineering Brass Band. The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band performed it for a Radio 3 concert of British brass music in November 1980, together with The Northern Brass Ensemble, conducted by Geoffrey Brand.

Illustrations for Brass Band

Score available:

○ Originally published by Novello. Email for sheet music enquiries: sales@studio-music.co.uk

 

Audio clip performers: The Black Dyke Mills Band conducted by Geoffrey Brand

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Front page of sheet music

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Variegations

Variegations was commissioned by the Department of Music at the University College Cardiff and first performed at the Reardon Smith Lecture Theatre in February 1971. It was written for solo viola and played by Eileen Engelbrecht. Phyllis Tate’s music was already well known to the Cardiff concert-going public, owing to the long and fruitful professional relationships and friendships enjoyed by both Phyllis and her husband, Alan Frank, with the then Head of Music at the University, composer Alun Hoddinott.

 

In the programme notes from this concert, Phyllis explains that ’the title “Variegations” implies to diversify in colour’ and she expounds the structure of the four movements. The Musical Times greeted the piece as ‘a welcome addition to the modern repertoire’, and expressed the view that ‘as an essay in the most difficult of mediums, it is a work of distinction.’

 

It was performed at the Purcell Room in May 1975 as part of a concert conducted by Roy Wales to celebrate Phyllis Tate’s 75th birthday, with Eileen Engelbrecht as the soloist.

Scores available:

○ Available from archive supplier Allegro

 

Audio clip performers: Eileen Engelbrecht (viola).

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Programme cover

Programme notes

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The Rainbow and the Cuckoo was composed for Sarah Francis (oboe) and the Cummings String Trio, and was first performed at the Purcell Room on November 2nd 1975. The programme notes describe the work as follows: ‘In form it is a quartet in which the oboe is on equal footing with the three stringed instruments, and is in one continuous movement.’ Phyllis Tate describes the composition as ‘a piece of varied monotony’. The germ of the piece lies in this quotation from a poem by W. H. Davies: ‘A rainbow and a cuckoo’s song may never come together again; may never come this side the tomb.’ W. H. Davies was an eccentric Welsh poet and writer, most famous for his book The Autobiography of a Super-Tramp. He was exactly the sort of character that Phyllis was drawn to and intrigued by throughout her life.

 

The reviews were unanimously excellent: ‘...a piece whose fanciful and ingenious formal pattern guides and contains a clear rivulet of true idyllic feeling’ (D. Shawe-Taylor, The Sunday Times, 1 May 1977). Edward Greenfield reviewed the première for The Guardian (11 November 1975): ‘Too few composers have written quartets for the combination of oboe and string trio and Phyllis Tate has now produced a work that says something different and new ... On the surface this is a piece of evocative writing but it is the pure musical logic of the work which is its most striking quality. The result is entirely individual, thanks to the ingenuity of Miss Tate’s string writing, with effects such as the quarter-tone glissando. As for the oboe, its expressiveness compasses not just the cuckoo but a whole aviary. Sarah Francis was the brilliant oboist in this première, her tone entirely individual, both reedy and mellow at the same time.’

 

The programme notes describe the work in some detail as follows: ‘The most obvious feature of the work is the insistent repetition of the cuckoo’s two notes, which make up a minor third. Many composers have built pieces on this phrase but in this work Phyllis Tate has incorporated the cuckoo motif, which pervades all the instrumental parts and all registers, into a 12-note motif which represents the symmetrical patterns and colours of the rainbow. This 12-note motif is used backwards, upside down, backwards and upside down, in reverse (where the cuckoo’s minor third becomes a major sixth) and in various combinations of these variants. This complex manipulation of the themes is, as it should be, subservient to the variation of mood and atmosphere which evoke the images of Davies’ poem. There is, in the composer’s words, much mist and haze with only occasional bursts of sun. The music fleetingly evokes rain at one moment, a squall, the ghost of a country dance, and church bells which are woven into the fabric before the mysterious opening mood returns and gradually subsides into silence - the ‘tomb’ of the poem. The cuckoo remains faithfully persistent to the very end.’

The Rainbow and the Cuckoo

Scores available:

○ Available on hire from Oxford University Press

 

Audio clip performers: Sarah Francis (oboe) and Cummings String Trio

Purcell Room concert programme

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A Lyric Suite was written in 1973 for the following year’s Cardiff Festival of Twentieth-Century Music. The composition is an eighteen-minute piano duet for four hands, written in five sections.

 

Phyllis Tate played several instruments, none of them, by her own admission, very well. They included her childhood ukulele and the timpani, of which she was sub-professor when a student at the Royal Academy of Music, and for which her perfect pitch was a necessity. However, the piano was her working tool as a composer and the only instrument in which she had any real proficiency. It is therefore surprising that she wrote little for solo piano, and this suite, for piano duet, is one of the few examples.

 

The first London performance took place at the Wigmore Hall in 1974, featuring Anne Shasby and Richard McMahon on piano. Robert Henderson reviewed the concert for The Daily Telegraph. He described the work as ‘delightfully unpredictable’ and went on to say that ‘In keeping with a genre traditionally associated with domestic music-making, its five short descriptive movements are both discreet and modestly proportioned … Sounding attractive to play, it is also intriguing to the listener. The implications for four hands playing on one keyboard are exploited with a pleasing ingenuity and gentle but off-beat humour. Though the melodic inflections and touches of harmonic asperity give to the music a slightly Gallic flavour, it cannot so easily be pinned down. At once ambiguous and diverting, it rarely does what is expected of it.’

 

The work was also performed at the Purcell Room in 1977 by Isabel Beyer and Harvey Dagul, as part of a programme of English piano duets dating from Elizabethan times to the present day. It was received with enthusiasm, ‘... a delight in its economic scoring, which presents a variety of moods with point and wit’ (The Daily Telegraph 5 March 1977).

 

In the programme notes Phyllis Tate describes the work as follows:

 

‘The five sections of this work are continuous.

 

‘1. Aubade: The first subject is made up of three motifs, and the development of these provides the material of the middle section. A recapitulation follows with a coda based on an extension of the first motif which gradually leads into:

2. Lullaby: This is on two levels, the secondo part plays a ‘crooning’, rocking figure only disturbed by an occasional ill-tempered forte, alternating with the primo part playing a well-known nursery rhyme. These two contrasting features are subsequently shared by the two performers and played backwards, inverted, backwards-inverted and finally combined.

3. Arabesque. Phrases from the Lullaby are interspersed with anticipations of the Ländler.

4. Ländler: This comprises of a refrain separated by three waltz fragments which are frequently overlapped by a cadential interruption. At the end a violently articulated high ‘C’ prepares the way for:

5. Dirge: Based on a ‘tear-drop’ scale descending by ninths and paralleled by rising sevenths, distributed among the four hands. In addition, there is a melodic line which develops and merges into a rather richer interlude. These ideas work up to a choral climax before subsiding into the Coda which ends with a sudden foreboding (ff) Middle C, with overtones.’

A Lyric Suite

Scores available:

○ Available from archive supplier Allegro , email sales@allegro.co.uk   01885 490375

 

Audio clip performers: unknown

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First performance

Programme cover from Purcell Room concert

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Air and Variations

Phyllis wrote five works involving the clarinet. Air and Variations was suggested - ‘commanded’ might be more accurate - by Sir William Glock (The Controller of Music at the BBC at the time), in a distinctly late night telephone call. It was written in 1957 and first performed for a BBC radio programme in December 1958.

 

It is a six-movement piece of 14 minutes’ duration, scored for violin, piano and clarinet in A. The Air is followed by five variations: 1. Aubade (a morning song), 2. Tempo di Valse (a waltz, clarinet and piano), 3. Serenade (violin and piano), 4.Tarantella (an Italian folk dance, violin and clarinet) and 5. Fugal March (finale). The composition ‘explores combinations of sound and texture - in fact three of the variations omit one instrument to fully exploit possibilities inherent in a particular pairing’ (programme notes from a concert by the Orion Ensemble, Chicago).

 

This piece was also performed at Phyllis’s memorial concert together with two of her other works for clarinet, her much-admired Sonata for Clarinet and Cello, and the Prelude-Aria-Interlude-Finale written about below.

Scores available:
Available from archive supplier Allegro

http://allegro.co.uk/air-variations-157477.html

 

Audio clip performers: Victoria Soames (clarinet), Andrew Roberts (violin) and Tanya Isaacson (piano).

Recorded in 1987 at the Memorial Concert for Phyllis Tate.

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Prelude Aria Interlude Finale

This 15-minute piece was commissioned by clarinettist Victoria Soames and pianist Julius Drake with funds made available from the Arts Council. They gave the work its first performance at the Purcell Room in late 1981. It turned out to be Phyllis’s last composition, and it was also performed by them at her memorial concert at St John’s in Hampstead on September 19th 1987.

 

Writing during a period of ill health, in parts of this composition Phyllis drew on aspects of her earlier works. The Prelude is based on an idea explored in the first movement of her Triptych, written in 1954 for violin and piano; in the later piece the clarinet takes on the lyrical piano part of the original. The second short movement, the Aria, is ‘obviously song-like but with a bit of an edge’ (programme notes from memorial concert) and plays with the same tune that Phyllis incorporated into the third movement of another early work, Duo Concertante. The Interlude, for clarinet alone, leads straight into the Finale, which investigates new territory with the character of a scherzo and a contrasted middle section, ’the chromaticism of which may suggest a Viennese flavour’ (P.T.).

Scores available:

○ Available from archive supplier Allegro

 

Audio clip performers: Victoria Soames (clarinet), Julius Drake (piano).

Recorded in 1987 at the Memorial Concert for Phyllis Tate.

 

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Phyllis Tate wrote this piece for the talented young piano accordion player Mario Conway and it was first performed at the Cardiff Festival of Music in 1981. One of Phyllis’s last works, Romance and Dance - Caprice was written at a time when she was far from well. Typically, she embraced the challenge wholeheartedly, buying an accordion and having lessons in order to understand the instrument.

 

The South Wales Echo of November 30th 1981 reviewed the concert as follows: ‘The Cardiff Festival of Music has commissioned more than 70 works in its 13-year history but the première of one piece yesterday must go down in the annals as the most unusual yet. Romanza and Dance - Caprice for piano accordion attracted a sizeable audience to the Reardon Smith Lecture Theatre. Phyllis Tate is a resourceful composer, ever eager to explore new ground. The performance in the deft hands of Mario Conway must be considered a major success. The Romanza opens with a haunting, lilting passage containing a melodic line many composers would give their left arm for. Gallic in mood, it gains in intensity before undergoing some development. The dance section is lively and colourful, exploring most registers of the solo instrument and on occasion requiring the player to tap the keyboard. Mario Conway, who is aged 27 and comes from Canton, Cardiff, is a player of incredible facility’ (A. J. Sicluna).

Romance and Dance Caprice

Scores available:

○ Unpublished.

Original score held in the British Music Collection at Heritage Quay, University of Huddersfield. Score not currently available online.

http://heritagequay.org/archives/?person=Phyllis+Tate

 

Audio clip performers: Mario Conway (piano accordion)

Private recording, originally on domestic cassette.

Phyllis's accordion

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This was one of Phyllis’s later works and was written for Douglas Tate (no relation!), who in addition to being the pre-eminent classical harmonica player of his time was a man of multiple talents and achievements. Initially an engineer, he was appointed head of the music department at a school in Dunstable, and afterwards ran the school’s business studies and computing departments. Subsequently he became head of research and design for what had become the largest computer firm in Europe, ICL. However, his real passion was playing and teaching music, and he saw the harmonica as one of the most cost-effective ways of getting children to play and enjoy music.

 

Douglas’s first collaboration with Phyllis was for her imaginative setting of ghost ballads Apparitions (1968) for tenor, string quartet and harmonica. The Sonatina is another example of Phyllis’s use of popular instruments not usually associated with classical music. An early example of this was her Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Strings (1944), followed by Illustrations for brass band (1969) and her Romance and Dance - Caprice for accordion (1981).

 

The harmonica, invented in Germany in the early nineteenth century, swiftly gained popularity by virtue of being easy to learn, cheap and uniquely compact in form. Lincoln was said to have always carried one in his pocket, and at the turn of the nineteenth century the Hohner factory in Germany was exporting five million instruments annually. However, it was only in the twentieth century that the harmonica began to be accepted in the concert hall when composers, among them Vaughan Williams and Milhaud, wrote works for the legendary player Larry Adler.

 

The Sonatina is scored for harmonica and harpsichord, and consists of four short movements. The first movement, ‘Prelude’, after a ‘pizzicato’ bridge passage on the harpsichord, leads into an ‘Air’ with variations. The third movement, ‘Intermezzo’, has resonances of Appalachian hill music, but is in fact based on a Northumbrian folk song. In the final ‘Rondo’ a 6/8 theme alternates with a march.

 

The piece was first performed by Douglas Tate with John Constable on the harpsichord in a BBC Radio 3 broadcast in 1976. The original manuscript score is dedicated to Douglas and in the possession of his widow, Barbara, who has scanned it so that it can be posted in its entirety on this site, and has generously provided information on the composition.

Scores available:

○ Score held in the British Music Collection at Heritage Quay, University of Huddersfield. Score not currently available online. http://heritagequay.org/archives/?person=Phyllis+Tate

 

Audio clip performers: Douglas Tate (harmonica), John Constable (harpsichord).

Sonatina Pastorale

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